How to Stand Out in Food Delivery Service Ads

It seems like nobody cooks anymore.  There are ads for food delivery services left and right; you almost can’t leave your apartment without seeing one.  So how do you stand out in such a vast market?  Here’s a look into five different food delivery services and the similar and different strategies they use:

1) Seamless
With about 234,000 orders placed per day, Seamless is currently top of the market in food delivery services.  The uniquely bright colors and clever one-liners draw attention, and customers.

2) GrubHub

GrubHub’s ads use a more pastel color palette than Seamless, and depict meticulously arranged food.  Their ads focus on the simplicity of the process of ordering food online, instead of using Seamless’ bandwagon technique (i.e., implying that all New Yorkers use Seamless.)

3) Uber Eats

Uber Eats’ ad campaign idea was uniquely simple--just use the layout of the app to depict the route that your potential deliverer could use to bring you food.  The campaign utilizes neutral colors and an unobtrusive font.  The result is straightforward and to the point.  

4) Caviar

Caviar’s campaign could use some angling.  Right now, their ads say things like, “Love great food?  Try Caviar!”  A little too simple.  Perhaps Caviar could take a lesson in angling from Seamless.

5) Eat 24:

Okay, let’s talk about Eat 24’s ad campaign for a second.  I’m shocked that I’ve only come across the ads recently.  The ads that they launched are shockingly sexual, all contributing to the idea that they are “the food delivery service for sexy geniuses.”  This is an interesting approach to food marketing, though the more traditional techniques utilized by Seamless and BGrubHub seem to be more effective, judging by daily users.

It’s tough to think of unique approaches in such a crowded market, and interesting to consider how the competition is handling the challenge.    

By: Ilana Weinberger

Case Studies of New York-Centric Ads

By the time you arrive at work in the morning, you have already been bombarded with ads.  Simply by walking to and out of the subway, and by being on the subway, you have already seen hundreds of images, logos, and slogans.  You are exposed to more than you realize; just try counting the ads on your commute tomorrow.  I take the 4/5/6 to get to work in the morning, and love paying attention to my morning subway’s ads.  Two of my favorite ad campaigns at the moment include and Seamless’ “How New York Eats” campaign and StreetEasy’s “Find Your Place” campaign.  This had me thinking about what works about these campaigns.  I realized that they actually have a lot in common—they both target New Yorkers in a way that pokes fun at their ridiculousness.

As a Jersey girl, I immediately noticed the immense differences between New Jersey and New York when I moved here about four years ago.  New Jersians have a reputation of being small-town and nice.  New Yorkers are known for being pretty much the opposite of that.  They have a reputation of being loud and audacious.  These differences made moving a state away feel like moving a world away.  I’ve learned a lot in this crazy city, mostly that you should be confident and try to expect the unexpected.  I’ve learned that New Yorkers are filled with contradictions—they want to go to brunch and yoga but they don’t want to spend money, they want to sleep but they also want to bragplain to their friends about how little they sleep.

        Seamless and StreetEasy understood just how crazy New Yorkers can be when they released their campaigns.  Seamless’ “How New York Eats” campaign includes tongue-in-cheek one-liners that harness the insanity that is New York dining.  One of my favorites goes, “Nothing ruins a good meal like other New Yorkers.”  The ad includes a graphic of the New York skyline.  The ads’ color schemes are bold, using background colors such as red, yellow, and blue.  All of the graphics are cartoonish, with fonts of all kinds.  The goal is to be fun enough to capture the attention of their target audience, New Yorkers, in an age where information is constantly thrown in consumers’ faces.

 

        StreetEasy also created their campaign around the idea of poking fun at New Yorkers in their “Find Your Place” campaign.  My favorite ad from this campaign reads, “No doorman for me.  I have enough people in my life judging me.”  This is just funny, and also points to the contradictory nature of New Yorkers—they want a doorman, but they also don’t want more people in their lives to judge them.  The ads in this campaign are subtler than Seamless’ ads; they are all different shades of blue, with words all in the same font, and with more subdued graphics.  The ads are unique in their format.  For example, in the doorman ad, the word “doorman” has a check mark next to it, as though you are on StreetEasy’s website and have the option of checking or exing the doorman box.


        Basically, New Yorkers are crazy, and ad creators are checking in to this truism.  I appreciate a good ad, and I’ve learned to love New York, so the combination that is utilized in Seamless and StreetEasy’s clever ads makes me smile.  What a funny city.  I heart NY.

By Ilana Weinberger